account of the different Earls of Northampton, from the time of William the Conqueror
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account of the different Earls of Northampton, from the time of William the Conqueror with an historical description of the noble family of Compton.

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Published by printed by J. Freeman in Northampton .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Compton family.

Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination47p.
Number of Pages47
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22454630M

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Exploring the successful Norman invasion of England in , this concise and readable book focuses especially on the often dramatic and enduring changes wrought by William the Conqueror and his followers. From the perspective of a modern social historian, Hugh M. Thomas considers the conquest's wide-ranging impact by taking a fresh look at such 3/5(1).   William I, (or in French; Guillaume I ‘Le Conquérant’ de NORMANDIE) was born around the year /8 in Falaise, Duchy of Normandy. Most famously he is known as William the Conqueror but due to his illegitimacy he is often referred as William the Bastard. French and his own research, is David Bates, Normandy before (Harlow, ), to which he added in William the Conqueror (London). In he and Anne Curry produced England and Normandy in the Middle Ages (London), a collection of essays by various Size: 6MB. The Domesday Book The thing for which William I is best remembered, aside from winning the battle of Hastings and making England a European kingdom, is the Domesday Book. The Domesday Book was, in effect, the first national census. It was a royal survey of all England for administration and tax purposes.

In , William extracted an oath of allegiance from Harold Godwinson, Earl of Wessex, brother-in-law of Edward II, and another possible contender to the throne. The oath acknowledged William’s right to succeed Edward.   In , the childless Edward invited young William to his court and reportedly promised William the throne when he died. William never forgot that promise – not for a second. However, in the time between and , Harold Godwinson, the scion of a noble and powerful family and accomplished warrior, had become Edward the Confessor’s brother in law, and was the Earl of Wessex. The "companions of William the Conqueror. As a matter of formerly-used historiography, a narrow definition of "Companion" of William the Conqueror has been regarding those who fought with him at The Battle of Hastings, the non-narrow definition sees William involved with other people and other events. King William I of England, also known as William the Conqueror, the only son of Robert I the Magnificent, Duke of Normandy, was born circa at the Château de Falaise in Falaise, Normandy (now in France). William was illegitimate as his mother Herleva of Falaise was his father’s mistress, and for that reason, he is sometimes called William the Bastard.

William I (c. – 9 September ), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from until his death in He was a descendant of Rollo and was Duke of Normandy from onward. His hold was secure on Normandy by , following a long struggle to establish his throne, Predecessor: Edgar the Ætheling . This is an old book - it was first published in under the title "William the Conqueror - the Norman impact upon England" - but it has stood the test of time. Since its publication, there have been numerous biographies of William the Conqueror in both English and French. Many of these are very good. Some are by: William I (c. Bates William the Conqueror p. 33 – 9 September ), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from until his death in relations. William and the exiled King did appear to become friends later on. After Edward had returned as King of England, he later passed away. Who the true heir to the thrown was, was contested. It was claimed by an English Earl, a Viking King, and William. The Pope at the time supported William's claim to the throne.